Garden of Destruction

Garden of Destruction

2016, 36" diameter x 8" deep;

Creation follows destruction.  Composition and some elements are borrowed from Buddhist mandala tradition.

Garden of Destruction (arch detail)

Garden of Destruction (arch detail)

A double-vajra crowns the arch.  Phurbas (three-bladed knives) top the pillars supporting the ends of the flame arches.  The phurba is a Buddhist symbol of destruction of the three poisons of ignorance, desire and hatred.

Garden of Destruction - figure detail

Garden of Destruction - figure detail

Figures depict working, playing, doing yoga and meditating.  Ideally, there should be little distinction between activities.

Burn

Burn

34" x 40" x 16"d; wood, putty, wax figures, acrylic paint, artificial plant parts

Burn - upper closeup

Burn - upper closeup

All of my figures have four arms, because they are not meant to represent the people we see ourselves to be.  They represent people with non-dualistic minds who would be very different from they way we are now.

Burn - lower closeup

Burn - lower closeup

This sculpture is based on the Tibetan Buddhist burial tradition of the Charnel Ground, where dead bodies are left to be consumed by wild animals and/or openly decay.  This sculpture simply depicts life and death.

Watershed

Watershed

63" x 44 1/2" x 20 1/2"d; wood, paper, plaster, sphagnum moss, gravel, acrylic paint, plastic

This is my rendition of Westchester County, NY.

America Unsettled

America Unsettled

24" x 24" x 70"h; Wood, paper maché, wax, acrylic paint

Inspired by the book "The Unsettling of America" by Wendell Berry

Untitled

Untitled

48 1/2" x 18 1/2"; wood, paper, sphagnum moss, acrylic paint

A map of Long Island, NY including Brooklyn and Queens.